Simply The Best

She lived only to love her kids and grandkids.  She never talked ill of anyone (except the arrogant) because they sinned or were different.  Nobody is perfect but she was a perfect mother.

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I don’t care if this is a Trifextra winner or not; it’s just an excuse to write a “Mother’s Day card” to my late mom, who would have been 97 on Friday.  She loved my dad too (though it wasn’t a real passionate love), but he just doesn’t fit into a 33 word story (and the kids always came first).  Before the Alzheimer’s (the same shit that took her mom and her two sisters) fully took hold of her brain, I told her that I had the sweetest mother and the sweetest daughter in the world, and I think she understood.  Happy Mom’s Day to all kids and all mothers.

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16 Responses to Simply The Best

  1. Lovely tribute to your mother. So sorry for you loss.
    Thanks for sharing your memories with us. Remember the new prompt on Monday.

  2. Gregoryno6 says:

    I’ll be using that in my MD piece today. Thaniks.

  3. k~ says:

    Sweet words for your mom… that was a nice read 🙂

  4. Folly & the Wrong Men says:

    let’s see….that would make you like….69? 79? I would have figured you for younger.

    • My family usually looked young for our ages. We also usually are late bloomers. Mom was 40 when I was born, and my daughter was born when I was almost 49. My retirement party and her high school graduation just might could be the same party.

  5. barbara says:

    a beautiful tribute to your Mom. I am sorry for your loss

  6. karen says:

    “She never talked ill of anyone because they sinned or were different.” — In my idea of the perfect mother, this fits so perfectly. Thanks for the reminder of what is truly important. A beautiful tribute to your mother.

  7. Have you read Sue Miller’s (Miller? Dreadful with names, it may be Sue something else) The Story of My Father? I think the most poignant part of the story is when she curses Alzheimer’s not for taking away her father, but for taking him away when she had only just found him.

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